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2016 - 2017 Projects and Publications

DALLAS AREA RAPID TRANSIT PROJECTS:

  • HISTORY OF ECONOMIC IMPACT SURROUNDING DART STATIONS

UNT has conducted six economic impact studies of DART LRT stations from 1999 to 2013. These impact studies range from the change in rental rates over time to the aggregated value of properties surrounding DART LRT stations. Though different in methodologies, the studies done over the past 17 years document the positive effects property values derive when located near a light rail station. Additionally, some studies highlight the substantial economic, fiscal, and developmental impacts that result from capital and operational spending by DART.

  • THE ECONOMIC IMPACT OF PUBLIC PROJECTS AT DART STATIONS

The analysis in this study covers development projects that were developed from DART’s early construction and therefore includes more that projects completed in 2014-2015.  This report excludes downtown stations because of the closeness of the stations and the resulting overlap in the ¼ mile criteria. 

  • THE ECONOMIC AND FISCAL IMPACTS OF DEVELOPMENT NEAR DART STATIONS 2014 – 2015

The purpose of this document is to identify and calculate economic impacts of real estate development projects within a quarter mile radius of DART light-rail stations. The study is a follow-up to the 2013 analysis completed by this office and analyzes development projects in 2014 and 2015.

THE ECONOMIC IMPACT AND URBAN INFLUENCE OF THE AT&T PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

In this study, we identify and quantify the economic and fiscal benefits that have attended construction and operations of the AT&T Performing Arts Center.  We also examine the ancillary real estate investment that has occurred in close proximity to the Center as well evidence that the arts district is helping market downtown Dallas and the entire DFW region to new and relocating businesses, residents, and conventioneers. 

THE ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF THE DALLAS-FT. WORTH CREATIVE ECONOMY

The Dallas Ft. Worth region’s creative economy is an important component of the region’s overall economy. It is the leading creative economy in the state of Texas and also among the largest nationwide. The Dallas-Ft. Worth creative economy offers substantial economic impacts and also outperformed the growth rate of the nation’s creative economy in the post-recessionary period of 2010 to 2015. Beyond economic impacts, the region’s creative economy has driven the development of cultural districts and may be a contributing factor helping to retain and attract an educated, highly skilled workforce and creating a “buzz” that plays a role in the decision-making process of firms looking to relocate to the region. Download the report here

THE ECONOMIC IMPACT OF CHILDREN’S HEALTH 2015

The purpose of this study is to measure the significant economic impact that Children’s Health has on the DFW economy.  The Economic Research Group (ERG) team at the University of North Texas calculated the annual economic impact for the fiscal year 2015.  The economic impact analysis is based on Children’s Health’s audited financial statements.  As a consequence, this study captures all financial activity conducted by the hospital and reported through their audited and compliant systems. This analysis includes expenditure items, such as purchases of tangible goods and related services, payroll for all staff, capital improvements, physical plant, and other healthcare services. You can find the link to the report here.

PLACE BRANDING: VIABLE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY OR PRACTITIONER PLACEBO

Much has been written about place branding in recent years.  Some authors believe a city’s brand is an important asset in positioning a city for future growth (Ashworth and Kavaratzis 2009).  Others believe logos and slogans have a limited impact (Govers 2013) and development efforts should be concentrated in other areas.  What the literature does agree on is the practitioner community’s fascination with superficial branding. Useful or not, the use of slogans and logos are certainly popular.   So popular in fact, many cities have multiple place branding slogans.  The U.S. cities of Austin, TX and Boulder, CO are good examples.   Austin wants to “Keep Austin Weird” so it can continue as the “Live Music Capital of the World.” Boulder claims to be “The Berkeley of the Rockies” but it secretly longs to be “The People's Republic of Boulder.”  While these slogans are certainly clever, the real question is do they provide any real economic benefit? 

This paper explores the use of place branding strategies as economic development tools.  Section one provides a brief review of the literature on place branding. It highlights some of the positive and negative aspects of the policy.  Section two presents an employment analysis of two U.S. cities (Las Vegas and Austin) that have place branding at the center of their economic development strategy. We examine employment trends before and after the implementation of the place branding to see if the strategy had any tangible impact on the cities employment base.  The final section is a policy discussion on the usefulness of place branding as an economic development strategy.  It provides suggestions to local practitioners for the implementation of branding strategies.      

THE CREATIVE ECONOMIES OF TEXAS METROPOLITAN REGIONS: A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS BEFORE, DURING, AND AFTER THE RECESSION

With the exception of Austin, metropolitan regions in Texas are not commonly included in the discourse concerning creative economies – attention is largely focused on either the traditional capitals of creative production, New York and Los Angeles, or emerging, secondary regions such as Austin and Portland, Oregon. This article utilizes an industrial approach to examine the creative economies of the four most populous metropolitan regions of Texas – Austin, Dallas, Houston, and San Antonio – and detail their scale, scope, and change between 2005 and 2015. Resulting insights help establish the Dallas, Houston, and San Antonio metropolitan regions in the creative economy discourse and offer further perspective on the dynamics of the Austin region’s creative economy. Additionally, special attention is paid to how these four creative economies transformed during the recessionary period from 2007 to 2009. Results of that attention build on prior research which points to the recession having a varied influence on creative economies depending on trends in the broader regional economies that house them.